City of Boston to Host Annual Rainbow Flag Raising Ceremony for Boston Pride

rainbow flag

BOSTON—Boston Pride will kick off Pride week with the annual Pride Flag Raising Ceremony on Friday, June 2 at 12:00 p.m. Sponsored by Mayor Martin J. Walsh, the Pride Flag Raising at City Hall is the first official event of Pride Week, June 2 – 11. Boston Pride is celebrating its 47 years of advocacy for the LGBTQ community with the theme, “Stronger Together.”  

The Pride Flag Raising Ceremony will also honor the legacy of the late Gilbert Baker who designed the first rainbow flag in 1978 which became a symbol of the LGBTQ rights movement. Baker recently passed away in March 2017 and the flag to be raised on City Hall Plaza is a design of one of his original rainbow flags with 8 colors that symbolized the LGBTQ rights movement: hot pink (sex), red (life), orange (healing), yellow (sunlight), green (nature), turquoise (art), indigo (harmony), violet (spirit).

In addition, one of Baker’s original flag designs will be displayed in the Pride Parade on June 10 as a testament to his grassroots advocacy on behalf of all LGBTQ people. The Pride Flag Raising will also recognize this year’s Grand Marshal Kristen Porter and Honorary Marshals, the late Norman Hill, Dr. Judy Bradford and John Michael Gray.

WHO:                   Mayor Martin J. Walsh

Boston City Councilors

Boston Pride Members

Grand Marshal

WHEN:                Friday, June 2, 2017 at 12:00 p.m.

WHERE:             City Hall Plaza, Boston, MA

For more information visit www.bostonpride.org.

Boston Pride produces events and activities to achieve inclusivity, equality, respect, and awareness in Greater Boston and beyond. Fostering diversity, unity, visibility and dignity, we educate, communicate and advocate by building and strengthening community connections. Boston Pride Week 2017 will be held June 2–11.

[From a News Release]


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3 Comments on "City of Boston to Host Annual Rainbow Flag Raising Ceremony for Boston Pride"

  1. A number of edits need to be made to this article: Firstly, the “is will” in the opening line of the story needs attention. But more importantly, our Grand Marshal’s name is Kristen Porter, not Kirsten. Likewise, “Michael” in John Michael Gray is misspelled. In addition, since the honorary marshalship is a posthumous honor, the adjective “late” before Norman Hill’s name makes it unclear that the following of the individuals named as Honorary Marshals (Dr. Bradford and Mr. Gray) are also deceased. Thanks in advance for making these important edits.

  2. A number of edits need to be made to this article: Firstly, the “is will” in the opening line of the story needs attention. But more importantly, our Grand Marshal’s name is Kristen Porter, not Kirsten. Likewise, “Michael” in John Michael Gray is misspelled. In addition, since the honorary marshalship is a posthumous honor, the adjective “late” before Norman Hill’s name makes it unclear that the other individuals named as Honorary Marshals (Dr. Bradford and Mr. Gray) are also deceased. Thanks in advance for making these important edits.

    • Michael Anthony Fowler (Boston Pride Guide Editor),
      Thank you for writing to The Rainbow Times about these “edits.” Unfortunately, given the hectic nature of these Pride months, in which we produce four print pieces in one month, we do not have our staff proof the press releases sent by Boston Pride, through your PR Company, O’Neil & Associates. This specific release was sent to us by Christian Rodriguez Shaw, who is one of their staff members, we believe.

      The first sentence that you refer to was sent to us by you, and spelled and edited by you. We merely published it, as an act of good faith to inform the community that we represent and continue to proudly provide the service we always provide. The 2nd edit that you mentioned, the name of your Grand Marshal, that TOO was listed as such on your press release. The 3rd edit that you’re referring to, the word “late” was again provided by your PR company and your organization. Lastly, we will be more than happy to provide you with a screen shot of exactly how this press release was sent to us, for your records.

      We know these situations happen in this business. We’ve been publishing our award-winning publication for 10 years and are aware of human errors. We make them too. This business of writing and editing is not as easy as it seems, even with a large staff or group of volunteers.

      We wish you good luck in your future endeavors and hope that your team corrects the press releases prior to sending them to us and other media outlets. At other, less hectic times of the year, we have (indeed) edited your press releases as a courtesy–we do it for all press releases that come to us.

      Happy Pride!

      Best, The Publishers (Gricel M. Ocasio and Nicole Lashomb)
      P.S. Some corrections, from the ones you mention above, have been made (not all).

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