Why Celebrating LGBT Latin@ Pride is Important

The alarming high rates of poverty, suicide, hatred, etc. happen in large numbers againt the LGBT Latino community and in communities of color, women, those living in poverty, with HIV, etc.
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The alarming high rates of poverty, suicide, hatred, etc. happen in large numbers againt the LGBT Latino community and in communities of color, women, those living in poverty, with HIV, etc.

The alarming high rates of poverty, suicide, hatred, etc. happen in large numbers againt the LGBT Latino community and in communities of color, women, those living in poverty, with HIV, etc.

• According to The annual Hate Violence Report released by the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs in 2012 (NCAVP), 73 % of ALL Anti-LGBTQ homicide victims were people of color, and 53% of anti-LGBTQ homocides were transgender women, mostly transgender women of color.

• As of 2007, Latinos became the largest ethnic minority in the United States (50 million people), surpassing African Americans?  A CMI, Inc. research found that proportionately, LGBT Latinos are also the second largest demographic in the LGBT community.**

• The same National Coalition of Anti-Violence Program (NCAVP) found that LGBTQ people of color were 1.82 times as likely to experience physical violence compared to White LGBTQ people.

• According to a Williams Institute analysis of Census 2000 data, almost one in five members of same-sex couples in the United States are people of color, and one in eight are Latino/a.

• The same 2012 Williams Institute analysis of Census 2000 data, shows that LGBT people of color are more likely to live in poverty. For example, African-American same-sex couples are significantly more likely to be poor than African-American married heterosexual counterparts and are roughly three times more likely to live in poverty than white same-sex couples.

• “Understanding the diversity within the LGBT community is both the key to breaking down the myth of affluence and to begin to understand where and how to combat LGBT poverty.”

• As The Rainbow Times has also been reporting through stories and opinion columns from Jason Lydon, Nicole Lashomb, Paul P. Jesep and Keegan O’Brien,  these discrepancies point to what many reference as a “network of progressive collations, among women, people of color, the young and the old, parents, and LGBT people, who must all work together to fight poverty. Work focused on just one, or even a few, of these groups will not produce a solution that will work for any single group or that will address poverty as a whole.”

*Excerpts for some of this information came from GLAAD: http://bit.ly/nhMsCj.

**From CMI’s 6th Annual LGBT Community Survey™, July 2013 (http://tiny.cc/toqq2w).